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Founder of Kabalah Yoga Visits Pacific Jewish Center

Being Rabbi at the Shul on the Beach gives me the opportunity to meet many people from all over the world with different backgrounds and a variety of interests. One of the more interesting people I have met in my Shul is Audi Gozlan.

Audi is an orthodox Jewish Yogi (also a lawyer) from Montreal Canada. He visits Venice on a regular basis to try and satisfy the local thirst for innovative and exciting Yoga programs. Audi teaches a discipline of Yoga that he personally developed called Kabalah Yoga.

Kabalah Yoga has become quite popular and Audi session’s are packed with instructors who want to teach Kabalah Yoga. Some sessions have upwards of 200 people in attendance. The attendees are usually quite surprised when they see Audi. He looks very religious and they start to think they are in the wr0ng place. But when Audi starts his session, they are shocked to see this man in a kipa and silver beard contort his body like a skilled Yogi.

The poses of Kabalah Yoga are in the shape of the letters of the Hebrew Aleph-Bet. The letters of the Hebrew Aleph-Bet have been interpreted in many ways. There is an entire corpus of study that uses the letters, their shapes, their sounds and their numerical values as tools for unlocking Torah secrets.

Audi is using them to unlock secrets of the human body.

I confess to never having participated in one of Audi’s sessions. But from what I hear, they are incredible. In Canada, a prime time Cable television show is being produced starring Audi and Kabalah Yoga. We may get it in the United States before long as well.

If you have any interest in Yoga in general I am sure you will find Audi’s website and videos fascinating.

If you want more information, check out Kabalah Yoga at http://www.kabalahyoga.com/ and on Facebook on their page.

Here is a very cool (well produced) sample video.


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  • http://Yeedle.weebly.com Yeedle

    It struck me funny that a guy like Rabbi Fink would write the following words: “The letters of the Hebrew Aleph-Bet have been interpreted in many ways. There is an entire corpus of study that uses the letters, their shapes, their sounds and their numerical values as tools for unlocking Torah secrets.”

    If you follow me and Rabbi Fink on twitter you definitely heard Rabbi Fink’s opinion about Kaballah, and to quote him (I couldn’t find the tweet so I’m quoting from memory. The exact language Rabbi Fink used might have been slightly different.) “Whenever it comes to a halacha that has it source in Kaballah, I’m EXTREMELY UNCOMFORTABLE”.

    And here you have Rabbi Fink write up a whole post all about the wonder’s of Kaballah Yoga, to which – I assume – the guy teaching it attributes a lot of its powers to the secret power of kaballah. Isn’t this funny?

    • http://finkorswim.com rabbifink

      Yeedle:

      What you quoted above from the post, is 100% accurate. Personally, I don’t study that corpus of knowledge. Plenty of others do.

      I maintain that kabbala used in HALACHA makes me uncomfortable. However kabbala used in Yoga is a totally different story. Yoga is nice on its own but yoga with extra spirituality infused in it is even better. There is no deception here. Kabbala is being used here to enhance the yoga experience. It is NOT being used to supplant Torah or influence halacha.

      To me, this exactly where kabbala works BEST. As part of a spiritual exercise that improves the exercise and not dictating Torah’s observance.

      • http://Yeedle.weebly.com Yeedle

        My question to you: Is the corpus of knowledge, as you refer to it, true and existing or is it all nice sounding hocas-pocas? Does the “extra spirituality” that kaballah infuses in yoga have a real effect on ones physical being or not? When someone does yoga in the form of otiyot, does it give the yoga a bigger chance of success?

        In other words: Do you believe in the basis of kaballah as something mystical that has tremendous impact on the world and on ones physical being, or do you view it as some nice interpretation of the torah?

        • http://finkorswim.com rabbifink

          Inconclusive.

          What I do know is that kabbala does next to nothing for me.